Picture Gallery for Sun 2005-06-12 15:01:46 UTC


Click to enlargeMark goes up to try to dry off the mirror by blowing some dry nitrogen on it.
Click to enlargeMark goes up to try to dry off the mirror by blowing some dry nitrogen on it.
Click to enlargeMark goes up to try to dry off the mirror by blowing some dry nitrogen on it. This didn't work. A towel on the end of a stick did.
Click to enlargeGoing out to the flightline.
Click to playGoing out to the flightline.
Click to enlargeGaelen documents the launch. Note the avant-garde toque/hard-hat combo.
Click to enlargeHercules rolling out to the flightline.
Click to enlargeHercules rolling out to the flightline.
Click to enlargeThe helium tankers and spool set out on one of the fingers with the ground cloths laid out.
Click to enlargeHercules rolling out to the flightline.
Click to enlargeHercules rolling out to the flightline.
Click to enlargeThe helium tankers, spool and balloon crate.
Click to enlargeThe surprise rain cloud receding over the horizon.
Click to enlargeThe surprise rain cloud receding over the horizon. This was the last bit of bad weather we've seen since it left. Sunday has had gorgeous weather.
Click to enlargeHercules rolling out to the flightline.
Click to enlargeThe parachute waiting for roll-out.
Click to enlargeHercules backing into position.
Click to enlargeLooking down the flightline.
Click to enlargeDerek at the reins.
Click to enlargeDerek at the reins.
Click to enlargeMark explains something about BLAST to the Genie operator.
Click to enlargeBLAST on the flightline.
Click to enlargeBLAST on the flightline.
Click to enlargeThe flightline.
Click to enlargeA mark to tell the riggers where to put the spool on one of the other fingers.
Click to enlargeOpening up the balloon crate: a good omen.
Click to enlargeOpening up the balloon crate: a good omen.
Click to enlargeLooking down the spool from the flightline.
Click to enlargeOne of the helium tankers plumbed and ready for inflation.
Click to enlargeWaiting.
Click to enlargeHercules's parking spot. You'll note that the surveying was spot on.
Click to enlargeMark and Marie balance the outer frame by moving lead bricks around.
Click to enlargeThe UTP (Universal Termination Package) which is responsible for releasing the parachute from the gondola at the Right Time. There's another UTP between the parachute and the balloon.
Click to enlargeUTP and parachute awaiting rollout.
Click to enlargeReleasing some ballast to compensate for the extra balancing brick that Mark and Marie added.
Click to enlargeFour cameras film the attachment of the parachute to the ladder. If there's anything this flight is not, it's under documented.
Click to enlargeGetting ready to roll out.
Click to enlargeA helicopter circles the pad.
Click to enlargeA helicopter circles the pad.
Click to enlargeOn the flightline.
Click to enlargeThe valves for the balloon fill lines.
Click to enlargeGetting ready to roll out.
Click to enlargeRolling out.
Click to playRolling out.
Click to enlargeRolling out the parachute.
Click to enlargeAttaching the UTP.
Click to enlargeHanging on the launch vehicle.
Click to enlargeBarth, Jeff, Enzo, and David watch a pie ball go up.
Click to enlargeThe flightline.
Click to enlargeErich and Victor discuss wind conditions. Victor is holding onto two pie balls at different altitudes. The two lines being at different angles means that the winds are different are at different velocities.
Click to enlargeThe release cord.
Click to enlargeMark removes the pump hose, the last thing we scientists have to do before launch.
Click to enlargeWaiting for go on inflation.
Click to enlargeLaying out the fill lines.
Click to enlargeLaying out the fill lines.
Click to enlargeReady for inflation.
Click to enlargeReady for inflation.
Click to enlargeInflation starts.
Click to enlargeInflation starts. The top of the balloon here is held down, for the first part of the fill.
Click to enlargeThe top of the balloon released, it now pops up vertically.
Click to enlargeInflation continues.
Click to enlargeInflation.
Click to enlargeReady for launch.
Click to enlargeInflation.
Click to enlargeInflation.
Click to enlargeReady for launch.
Click to enlargeTurning the gondola towards the sun to help charge the batteries.
Click to enlargeInflation.
Click to enlargeInflation.
Click to enlargeInflation. Inflation took a good hour.
Click to enlargeThe view from the deck of Hercules. You can make out the flightline through the cab windows.
Click to enlargeNearing the end of inflation.
Click to enlargeGaelen shoots some film.
Click to enlargeNearing the end of inflation. Note the tension on the flight train which has lifted the parachute off the ground. As the balloon is filled, it's slowly winched up around the spool.
Click to enlargeDavid with the telescope.
Click to enlargeNearing the end of inflation.
Click to enlargeMarie steadies the gondola.
Click to enlargeFlightline.
Click to playLaunch video. Comparing this to the Fort Sumner launch, you'll notice the launch vehicle moves around a fair bit. This was a fairly typical launch.
Click to enlargeBLAST ascends. The balloon looks almost empty here. As it rises and the pressure drops, the balloon will fill out. The bottom of the balloon is at the top of the (orange) parachute.
Click to enlargeBLAST ascends.
Click to enlargeHercules post-launch.
Click to enlargeBLAST ascends. The white dot is one of the pie balls.
Click to enlargeBLAST ascends. The white dot is one of the pie balls.
Click to enlargeReturning to the high-bay after a successful launch.
Click to enlargeBLAST ascends. The white dot is one of the pie balls.
Click to enlargeBLAST at 24 kilometres. The balloon is still mostly uninflated.
Click to enlargeBLAST at float. Believe it or not, the balloon's in this picture. Try to find it. (Hint: it's near the centre of the picture.)

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© 2006 D. V. Wiebe. Generated Fri 2017-03-24 10:07:03 UTC